Human rights as politics and idolatry pdf

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human rights as politics and idolatry pdf

Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry: - Michael Ignatieff - Google Books

The South Atlantic Quarterly Working through them also allows him to develop and rest his own case for human rights: human rights activism is valuable not because it is founded on some transcendent truth, advances some ultimate principle, is a comprehensive politics, or is [End Page ] clean of the danger of political manipulation or compromise, but rather, simply because it is effective in limiting political violence and reducing misery. If, in the last fifty years, human rights have become the international moral currency by which some human suffering can be stemmed, then they are a good thing. Responding to the commentaries published along with his lectures, these are Ignatieff's final words:. An instrument for abating the grievous suffering of targeted individuals and groups, stanching the flow of human blood, diminishing cries of human pain, unbending the crouch of human fear—who could argue with this, especially when the historical present features so much politically let blood, politically inflicted pain, and politically induced fear? Indeed one cannot argue with it, nor will I.
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The Debasement of Human Rights: How Politics Sabotage the Ideal of Freedom

Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry

Jump to navigation. An elegant reflection on the foundations of the international human rights revolution. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights of gave the rights of individuals international legal recognition. But the spread of human rights norms since then has not resolved basic questions about the legal and political grounds for human rights, which transcend both the sovereign state and the legitimacy of coercive intervention to enforce norms. Addressing this quandary, Ignatieff argues that international human rights norms are best defended on pragmatic grounds: when individuals have defensible rights, they are less likely to be abused. But the protection of human agency -- the ability of individuals to resist an unjust state -- is what gives the international human rights movement its potential appeal outside the West.

With a comm. Aims and Scope Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in , this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn criticism from Asia, the Islamic world, and within the West itself for being overambitious and unwilling to accept limits. It is now time, he writes, for activists to embrace a more modest agenda and to reestablish the balance between the rights of states and the rights of citizens. Ignatieff begins by examining the politics of human rights, assessing when it is appropriate to use the fact of human rights abuse to justify intervention in other countries.

Michael Ignatieff. Many of our ebooks are available through library electronic resources including these platforms:. Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. But it has also faced challenges. Ignatieff argues that human rights activists have rightly drawn criticism from Asia, the Islamic world, and within the West itself for being overambitious and unwilling to accept limits.

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Human Rights as Politics and Idolatry may raise some hackles for its controversial approach to a sacrosanct subject, but Michael Ignatieff's arguments are carefully wrought and compassionate., Michael Ignatieff draws on his extensive experience as a writer and commentator on world affairs to present a penetrating account of the successes, failures, and prospects of the human rights revolution. Since the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in , this revolution has brought the world moral progress and broken the nation-state's monopoly on the conduct of international affairs.

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